The Brain Makes its Own Marijuana

There is sacred knowledge in understanding seeds.  For example, the oath of secrecy that Freemasons take is primarily concerned with keeping this sacred knowledge of seeds (spermology and carpology) to themselves.  Find out some interesting facts about seeds from Wikipedia here:


Seed – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

THE BRAIN’S OWN MARIJUANA

The Future of Medicine and The Miracle Drug of the 21st Century

Cannabinoids may cause anti-tumor effects by various mechanisms, including induction of cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Cannabinoids appear to kill tumor cells but do not affect their nontransformed counterparts and may even protect them from cell death.”

…”The potential benefits of medicinal cannabis for people living with cancer include anti-emetic effects, appetite stimulation, pain relief, and improved sleep. In the practice of integrative oncology, the health care provider may recommend medicinal cannabis not only for symptom management but also for its possible direct anti-tumor effect.” – NIH


One of the aims of Freemasonry has not simply been the intellectual confusion caused by their “marijuana” propaganda to support their conspiracy against Cannabis and Hemp, but ultimately they seek the total spiritual, physical and moral destruction of their victims by making the Holy Herb of Cannabis illegal for use in daily prayers, depriving the people of the single food source that contains all essential amino acids required to sustain human life, placing the treatment of cancer outside the reach of the common man, and “marking” those in possession of or trading with it with lifetime stigma that robs them of the general benefits afforded to the rest of society.  Radiation causes cancer.  This is a fact. Cannabis kills cancer cells. This is a fact.  Now you know at least one reason why it is “illegal”.  It has very little to do with social ethics or safety.


Legal history of cannabis in Canada  
Portal:Cannabis

Extract from Marijuana History

Marijuana has been used as an agent for achieving euphoria since ancient times; it was described in a Chinese medical reference traditionally considered to date from 2737 B.C. Its use spread from China to India and then to N Africa and reached Europe at least as early as A.D. 500.

Marijuana Plants / Cannabis

The first direct reference to a cannabis product as a psychoactive agent dates from 2737 BC, in the writings of the Chinese emperor Shen Nung. The focus was on its powers as a medication for rheumatism, gout, malaria, and oddly enough, absent-mindedness. Mention was made of the intoxicating properties, but the medicinal value was considered more important. In India though it was clearly used recreationally. The Muslims too used it recreationally for alcohol consumption was banned by the Koran. It was the Muslims who introduced hashish, whose popularity spread quickly throughout 12th century Persia (Iran) and North Africa.
In 1545 the Spanish brought marijunana to the New World. The English introduced it in Jamestown in 1611 where it became a major commercial crop alongside tobacco and was grown as a source of fiber.
By 1890, hemp had been replaced by cotton as a major cash crop in southern states. Some patent medicines during this era contained marijuana, but it was a small percentage compared to the number containing opium or cocaine. It was in the 1920’s that marijuana began to catch on. Some historians say its emergence was brought about by Prohibition. Its recreational use was restricted to jazz musicians and people in show business. “Reefer songs” became the rage of the jazz world. Marijuana clubs, called tea pads, sprang up in every major city. These marijuana establishments were tolerated by the authorities because marijuana was not illegal and patrons showed no evidence of making a nuisance of themselves or disturbing the community. Marijuana was not considered a social threat.
Marijuana was listed in the United States Pharmacopeia from 1850 until 1942 and was prescribed for various conditions including labor pains, nausea, and rheumatism. Its use as an intoxicant was also commonplace from the 1850s to the 1930s. A campaign conducted in the 1930s by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Narcotics (now the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs) sought to portray marijuana as a powerful, addicting substance that would lead users into narcotics addiction. It is still considered a “gateway” drug by some authorities. In the 1950s it was an accessory of the beat generation; in the 1960s it was used by college students and “hippies” and became a symbol of rebellion against authority.
The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 classified marijuana along with heroin and LSD as a Schedule I drug, i.e., having the relatively highest abuse potential and no accepted medical use. Most marijuana at that time came from Mexico, but in 1975 the Mexican government agreed to eradicate the crop by spraying it with the herbicide paraquat, raising fears of toxic side effects. Colombia then became the main supplier. The “zero tolerance” climate of the Reagan and Bush administrations resulted in passage of strict laws and mandatory sentences for possession of marijuana and in heightened vigilance against smuggling at the southern borders. The “war on drugs” thus brought with it a shift from reliance on imported supplies to domestic cultivation (particularly in Hawaii and California). Beginning in 1982 the Drug Enforcement Administration turned increased attention to marijuana farms in the United States, and there was a shift to the indoor growing of plants specially developed for small size and high yield. After over a decade of decreasing use, marijuana smoking began an upward trend once more in the early 1990s, especially among teenagers.
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Brain Makes its Own Marijuana

  1. actually honey is the only food that contains all nutrients for life, and honey is the only food that never goes stale, it is actually possible to live only on honey

  2. Yep, except a couple decades ago some honey was purportedly found in an urn in an old tomb and was found to contained some botulism spores, or so the story went. This caused either a rumor or doctors to start saying no honey for infants under 6 months old. I guess botulism doesn't bother anyone under 6 months old. 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s